Below are the five most recent posts in my weblog. You can also see a chronological list of all posts, dating back to 1999.

just TODO it UI

Recently, I wished to use a trivially-simple TODO-list application whilst working on a project. I had a look through what was available to me in the "GNOME Software" application and was surprised to find nothing suitable. In particular I just wanted to capture a list of actions that I could tick off; I didn't want anything more sophisticated than that (and indeed, more sophistication would mean a learning curve I couldn't afford at the time). I then remembered that I'd written one myself, twelve years ago. So I found the old code, dusted it off, made some small adjustments so it would work on modern systems and published it.

At the time that I wrote it, I found (at least) one other similar piece of software called "Tasks" which used Evolution's TODO-list as the back-end data store. I can no longer find any trace of this software, and the old web host (projects.o-hand.com) has disappeared.

My tool is called Just TODO It and it does very little. If that's what you want, great! You can reach the source via that prior link or jump straight to GitHub: https://github.com/jmtd/todo

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I've been thoroughly enjoying the Jason Scott Talks His Way Out Of It Podcast by Jason Scott (of the Internet Archive and Archive Team, amongst other things) and perhaps you will too.

Scott started this podcast and a corresponding Patreon/LibrePay/Ko-Fi/Paypal/etc funding stream in order to help him get out of debt. He's candid about getting in and out of debt within the podcast itself; but he also talks about his work at The Internet Archive, the history of Bulletin-Board Systems, Archive Team, and many other topics. He's a good speaker and it's well worth your time. Consider supporting him too!

This reminds me that I am overdue writing an update on my own archiving activities over the last few years. Stay tuned…

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For a few years now I have been working on-and-off on a personal project to import data from a large collection of home-made CD-Rs and DVD-Rs. I've started writing up my notes, experiences and advice for performing a project like this; but they aren't yet in a particularly legible state.

As part of this work I wrote some software called "BadISO" which takes a possibly-corrupted or incomplete optical disc image (specifically ISO9660) and combined with a GNU ddrescue map (or log) file, tells you which files within the image are intact, and which are not. The idea is you have tried to import a disc using ddrescue and some areas of the disc have not read successfully. The ddrescue map file tells you which areas in byte terms, but not what files that corresponds to. BadISO plugs that gap.

Here's some example output:

$ badiso my_files.iso
…
✔ ./joes/allstars.zip
✗ ./joes/ban.gif
✔ ./joes/eur-mgse.zip
✔ ./joes/gold.zip
✗ ./joes/graphhack.txt
…

BadISO was (and really, is) a hacky proof of concept written in Python. I have ambitions to re-write it properly (in either Idris or Haskell) but I'm not going to get around to it in the near future, and in the meantime at least one other person has found this useful. So I'm publishing it in its current state.

BadISO currently requires GNU xorriso.

You can grab it from https://github.com/jmtd/badiso.

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In 2008 I read a blog post by Mark Pilgrim which made a profound impact on me, although I didn't realise it at the time. It was

  1. Stop buying stuff you don’t need
  2. Pay off all your credit cards
  3. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in your house/apartment (storage lockers, etc.)
  4. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit on the first floor of your house (attic, garage, etc.)
  5. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in one room of your house
  6. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in a suitcase
  7. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in a backpack
  8. Get rid of the backpack

At the time I first read it, I think I could see (and concur) with the logic behind the first few points, but not further. Revisiting it now I can agree much further along the list and I'm wondering if I'm brave enough to get to the last step, or anywhere near it.

Mark was obviously going on a journey, and another stopping-off point for him on that journey was to delete his entire online persona, which is why I've linked to the Wayback Machine copy of the blog post.

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I prefer the book The Hobbit to The Lord Of The Rings.

I much prefer the Hobbit movies to the LOTR movies.

I like the fact the Hobbit movies were extended with material not in the original book: I'm glad there are female characters. I love the additional material with Radagast the Brown. I love the singing and poems and sense of fun preserved from what was a novel for children.

I find the foreshadowing of Sauron in The Hobbit movies to more effectively convey a sense of dread and power than actual Sauron in the LOTR movies.

Whilst I am generally bored by large CGI battles, I find the skirmishes in The Hobbit movies to be less boring than the epic-scale ones in LOTR.

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Older posts are available on the all posts page.


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