Below are the five most recent posts in my weblog. You can also see a chronological list of all posts, dating back to 1999.

Thumbnail of the poster

Thumbnail of the poster

Today the School of Computing organised a poster session for stage 2 & 3 PhD candidates. Here's the poster I submitted. jdowland-phd-poster.pdf (692K)

This is the first poster I've prepared for my PhD work. I opted to follow the "BetterPoster" principles established by Mike Morrison. These are best summarized in his #BetterPoster 2 minute YouTube video. I adapted this LaTeX #BetterPoster template. This template is licensed under the GPL v3.0 which requires me to provide the source of the poster, so here it is.

After browsing around other student's posters, two things I would now add to the poster would be a mugshot (so people could easily determine who's poster it was, if they wanted to ask questions) and Red Hat's logo, to acknowledge their support of my work.

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As promised, here's the report I wrote for my PhD Stage 1 progression in the hope that it is useful or interesting to someone. I've made some very small modifications to the submitted copy in order to remove some personal information.

I'll reiterate something from when I published my proposal:

A document produced for one institution's expectations might not be directly applicable to another. … You don't have any idea whether it has been judged to be particularly good or bad one by those who received it (you can make your own judgements).

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Back In July I decided to take a (minimum) six months hiatus from involvement in the Debian project. This is for a number of reasons, but I completely forgot to write about it publically. So here we are.

I'm going to look at things again no sooner than January 2020 and decide whether or not (or how much) to pick it back up.

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When it comes to organising myself, I've long been anachronistic. I've relied upon paper notebooks for most of my life. In the last 15 years I've stuck to a particular type of diary/notebook hybrid, with a week-to-view on the left-hand side of pages and lined notebook pages on the right.

This worked well for me for my own personal stuff but obviously didn't work well for family things that need to be shared. Trying to find systems that work for both my wife and I has proven really challenging. The best we've come up with so far is a shared (IMAP) account and Apple's notes apps.

On iOS, Apple's low-frills note-taking app lets you synchronise your notes with a mail account (over IMAP). It stores them individually in HTML format, one email per note page, in a mailbox called "Notes". You can set up note syncing to the same account from multiple devices, and so we have a "family" mailbox set up on both my phone and my wife's. I can also get at the notes using any other mail client if I need to.

This works surprisingly well, but not perfectly. In particular synchronising changes to notes can go wrong if we both have the same note page open at the same time. The failure mode is not the worst: it duplicates the note into two; but it's still a problem.

Can anyone recommend a simple, more robust system for sharing notes — and task lists — between people? For task lists, it would be lovely (but not essential) if we could tick things off. At the moment we manage that just as free-form text.

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After 5 years of continuous service, the mainboard in my NAS recently failed (at the worst possible moment). I opted to replace the mainboard with a more modern version of the same idea: ASRock J4105-ITX featuring the Intel J4105, an integrated J-series Celeron CPU, designed to be passively cooled, and I've left the rest of the machine as it was.

In the process of researching which CPU/mainboard to buy, I was pointed at the Odroid-H2: a single-board computer (SBC) designed/marketed at a similar sector to things like the Raspberry PI (but featuring the exact same CPU as the mainboard I eventually settled on). I've always felt that the case I'm using for my NAS is too large, but didn't want to spend much money on a smaller one. The ODroid-H2 has a number of cheap, custom-made cases for different use-cases, including one for NAS-style work, which is in a very small footprint: the "Case 1". Unfortunately this case positions two disk drives flat, one vertically above the other, and both above the SBC. I was too concerned that one drive would be heating the other, and cumulatively both heating the SBC at that orientation. The case is designed with a fan but I want to avoid requiring one. I had too many bad memories of trying to control the heat in my first NAS, the Thecus n2100, which (by default) oriented the drives in the same way (and for some reason it never occurred to me to rotate that device into the "toaster" orientation).

I've mildly revised my NAS page to reflect the change. Interestingly most of the niggles I was experiencing were all about the old mainboard, so I've moved them on a separate page (J1900N-D3V) in case they are useful to someone.

At some point in the future I hope to spend a little bit of time on the software side of things, as some of the features of my set up are no longer working as they should: I can't remote-decrypt the main disk via SSH on boot, and the first run of any backup fails due to some kind of race condition in the systemd unit dependencies. (The first attempt does not correctly mount the backup partition; the second attempt always succeeds).

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