This is a fairly self-indulgent post, sorry!

Encouraged by Evgeni, Michael and others, given I'm spending a lot more time at my desk in my home office, here's a picture of it:

Fisheye shot of my home office

Fisheye shot of my home office

Near enough everything in the study is a work in progress.

The KALLAX behind my desk is a recent addition (under duress) because we have nowhere else to put it. Sadly I can't see it going away any time soon. On the up-side, since Christmas I've had my record player and collection in and on top of it, so I can listen to records whilst working.

The arm chair is a recent move from another room. It's a nice place to take some work calls, serving as a change of scene, and I hope to add a reading light sometime. The desk chair is some Ikea model I can't recall, which is sufficient, and just fits into the desk cavity. (I'm fairly sure my Aeron, inaccessible elsewhere, would not fit.)

I've had this old mahogany, leather-topped desk since I was a teenager and it's a blessing and a curse. Mostly a blessing: It's a lovely big desk. The main drawback is it's very much not height adjustable. At the back is a custom made, full-width monitor stand/shelf, a recent gift produced to specification by my Dad, a retired carpenter.

On the top: my work Thinkpad T470s laptop, geared more towards portable than powerful (my normal preference), although for the forseeable future it's going to remain in the exact same place; an Ikea desk lamp (I can't recall the model); a 27" 4K LG monitor, the cheapest such I could find when I bought it; an old LCD Analog TV, fantastic for vintage consoles and the like.

Underneath: An Alesis Micron 2½ octave analog-modelling synthesizer; various hubs and similar things; My Amiga 500.

Like Evgeni, my normal keyboard is a ThinkPad Compact USB Keyboard with TrackPoint. I've been using different generations of these styles of keyboards for a long time now, initially because I loved the trackpoint pointer. I'm very curious about trying out mechanical keyboards, as I have very fond memories of my first IBM Model M buckled-spring keyboard, but I haven't dipped my toes into that money-trap just yet. The Thinkpad keyboard is rubber-dome, but it's a good one.

Wedged between the right-hand bookcases are a stack of IT-related things: new printer; deprecated printer; old/spare/play laptops, docks and chargers; managed network switch; NAS.


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